Awakened Imagination by Neville Goddard

Posted: June 8, 2017 by Thrivelearning in purpose
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Awakened Imagination by Neville GoddardAwakened Imagination by Neville Goddard

The Power That Makes Achievement and Attainment Inevitable.

CERTAIN WORDS in the course of long use gather so many strange connotations that they almost cease to mean anything at all. Such a word is imagination. This word is made to serve all manner of ideas, some of them directly opposed to one another. Fancy, thought, hallucination, suspicion: indeed, so wide is its use and so varied its meanings, the word imagination has no status nor fixed significance. For example, we ask a man to “use his imagination,” meaning that his present outlook is too restricted and therefore not equal to the task.

In the next breath we tell him that his ideas are “pure imagination,” thereby implying that his ideas are unsound. We speak of a jealous or suspicious person as a “victim of his own imagination,” mean-mg that his thoughts are untrue. A minute later we pay a man the highest tribute by describing him as a “man of imagination.” Thus the word imagination has no definite meaning. Even the dictionary gives us no help. It defines imagination as (1) the picturing power or act of the mind, the constructive or creative principle; (2) a phantasm; (3) an irrational notion or behef; (4) planning, plotting or scheming as involving mental construction.

Using short quotations from the Bible and from Blake, Yeats, Emerson, Lawrence, Quintillian, Hermes, and the Hermetica, Neville reveals the Power that makes the achievement of aims, the attainment of desires, inevitable; showing that the Christ is the human imagination.

In this book the author talks about how to manifest his imaginations and receive what you have longed for. Powerful and yet easy to understand by everybody. Not more than a day’s reading, but it will shed a new light on many things.

About the Author

Neville Lancelot Goddard (1905-1972) was a prophet, profoundly influential teacher, and author. He did not associate himself as a metaphysician, with any ‘ism’ or ‘New Thought’ teaching as commonly advertised by these collective groups. Goddard was sent to illustrate the teachings of psychological truth intended in the Biblical teachings, and restore awareness of meaning to what the ancients intended to tell the world.

Goddard’s interest in esoteric interpretations of the Bible deepened after he met Abdullah, an Ethopian Jew who lectured on Esoteric Christianity and taught both Goddard and Joseph Murphy. Neville went to hear him somewhat under protest to satisfy the constant urging of a friend, saying “I recall the first night I met Abdullah. I had purposely delayed going to one of his meetings because a man whose judgement I did not trust had insisted on my attendance. At the end of the meeting, Ab approached me and said: ‘Neville, you are six months late.’ Startled, I questioned how he knew my name, when he said: ‘The brothers told me you would be here six months ago.’ Then he added: ‘I will remain until you have received all that I must give you. Then I will depart.’ He, too, may have longed to go, but he had to wait for me.” From this introduction, Neville studied with Abdullah learning Hebrew, the Kabbalah, and the hidden symbolic meaning of Scripture.

After traveling extensively throughout the United States, Neville eventually made his home in Los Angeles where, in the 1950s, he gave a series of talks on television and radio, and for many years lectured regularly to capacity audiences at the Wilshire Ebell Theater. In the 1960s and early 1970s, he confined most of his lectures to Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco.

In his early lectures and books Neville dealt solely with what he called The Law, the technique of creating one’s physical reality through imagining. It is this portion of his expression that most closely accords with the teachings of the New Thought movement. In describing The Law, Neville related how he made a sea voyage from New York to see his family in Barbados during theDepression, without any money of his own.

He related how, by the use of imaginal power, he was honorably discharged from military service to continue his lectures during World War II. He gave his audiences in San Francisco in the 1950s and 1960s accounts of how others had made use of The Law. He discussed it on television in the Los Angeles area, saying, “Learn how to use your imaginal power, lovingly, on behalf of others, for Man is moving into a world where everything is subject to his imaginal power.” (Wikipedia)

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